BBKA News Feed

  1. Calling all teen beeks… It’s that time of year again when we start recruiting young beekeepers for the 2019 IMYB which is in its 10th year and is being held in Banská Bystrica, Slovakia, on the  3rd July - 7th July 2019. As before, we are looking for a team of three teen beeks aged between 12-17 with either the BBKA Basic or Junior Assessment (or equivalent experience) to come on an all expenses paid, life-changing trip. You will meet, work and learn from fellow young beekeepers from almost 30 countries around the world and a great time is guaranteed! As before, we are holding our team selection day on Sunday 10th March at the BBKA HQ at Stoneleigh Park in Warwickshire from 10:30 am and will take 4-5 hours.  Each candidate will take part in a series of written and practical exercises either individually or in a group, and we will make our team selection by the end of the day. We are looking for three candidates plus a reserve and each must have a valid p...
  2. 13 February 2019 The first Asian Hornet of 2019 has been found in the British Isles. A foundress queen hornet emerged from hibernation at St Heliers Bay on the island of Jersey. The hornet had been sheltering in hessian used to protect ships cables. She was captured.  Last year, Asian hornet hunters and pest controllers on the island, found and destroyed more than 50 nests estimated to produce 200 queens each.  Even with high winter mortality, it's expected to be a testing season for island beekeepers.  -ends- 
  3. Trustees Liability Schedule Management Liability Policy
  4. John Canning - elected January 2019 ADM for a 3 year term I am a recently retired GP and have been keeping bees for 6 years. For over 30 years I have been involved in organisations, at both local and national levels, which are representative and democratic. I have been particularly keen to ensure safe and accountable structures are in place to enable the organisation to concentrate on its primary objectives. I am passionate about beekeeping, and the need for clear national representation to ensure that the BBKA provides a strong voice for honeybees and beekeepers. My experience of changing representative organisations will be helpful the to the Trustees. I am also committed to ensuring that central organisations help local ones to flourish. Email here 
  5. Why Do Bees Make Honey? Honey bees are special in that they overwinter as a colony, unlike wasps and bumblebees (see Biology). The colony does not hibernate but stays active and clusters together to stay warm. This requires a lot of food, which is stored during the summer. Although a hive only needs 20-30 lb of honey to survive an average winter, the bees are capable of collecting much more, if given storage space. This is what the beekeeper wants them to do. Bees have been producing honey in the same way for over one hundred and fifty million years How Much Honey Can One Beehive Produce? One hive can produce 60 lb (27 kg) or more in a good season, however an average hive would be around 25 lb (11 kg) surplus. Bees fly about 55,000 miles to make just one pound of honey, that’s 2.2 times around the world. Romans used honey instead of gold to pay their taxes. How Does The Beekeeper Get The Honey From The Bees? The queen bee is kept below the upper boxes (called &lsquo...
  6. Beeswax  Made from the honeycomb of the honeybee, beeswax is the purest and most natural of all waxes. For each pound of beeswax provided by a honey bee, the bee visits over 30 million flowers. To produce one pound of wax requires the bees to consume about eight to ten pounds of honey. They secrete the beeswax from the underside of their abdomens, and then use the wax to construct a honeycomb. The youngest bees cluster in large numbers to raise their body temperature. Wax-producing glands under their abdomens slowly secrete slivers of wax about the size of a pinhead. Other worker bees harvest these wax scales and take them to the part of the hive requiring the new wax. Bees use about 6 lb of honey to produce 1 lb of wax. Bee bread 'Edible grade' pollen or 'bee bread' is a mixture of plant pollen and honey, which bees mould into granules and store in their honeycombs. Plant pollen can make you sneeze and have a runny nose and eyes if you are allergic to it, but people eat bee...
  7. Shop for honey and you'll see that some are lighter, others are darker. In general, the darker the honey, the better its antibacterial and antioxidant power. Honey was known to the Greeks as the "food of the Gods." Honey was used in WWI to treat soldiers wounds. It is still used in wound dressings  today - medical grade honey is found to work against bacteria and fungi by creating a moist healing environment that is antibacterial in nature.
  8. THREATS TO UK HONEY BEES Habitat loss Use of pesticides Pests and diseases Extreme weather and climate change, and Competition from invasive species Ways to help Grow more flowers, shrubs & trees  Let your garden grow wild Cut grass less often Don’t disturb insect nests & hibernation spots Try and not use pesticides Open to letter to Councils across the UK - please feel free to copy and send to your local Council Please also consider donating 
  9. Legs – The honey bee has three pairs of legs, six legs in total. However, the rear pair is specially designed with stiff hairs to store pollen when in flying from flower to flower. This is why a heavily laden  worker bee is seen to have two golden pouches in full season. The front pair of legs has special slots to enable the bee to clean its antenna. Wings – The honey bee has four wings in total. The front and rear wings hook together to form one big pair of wings and unhook for easy folding when not flying. Eyes – Incredible as it may seem, the honey bee has FIVE eyes, two large compound eyes and three smaller ocelli eyes in the centre of its head.
  10. For any branches or associations who are yet to nominate their AHAT coordinator, please email gen.manager@bbka.org.uk with the details. You will find our advice here  Please action this asap to ensure we can all help the NBU in the coordinated response to this invasive species.
  11. Harper Adams University, Newport,  Shropshire,  TF10 8NB 12,13,14 April 2019   The National Beekeeping Event of the Year! 20+ Lectures; 60+ Workshops & Seminars for all levels of beekeeping experience  Research Session Saturday 13th for BBKA sponsored studies Hear from scientist Samuel Ramsey who discovered varroa mites feed on bee organs not their blood    Large Tradeshow Saturday 13th  Excellent facilities and great value catering  On-site, en-suite accommodation Book Now Click on the blue links for more information: download the Full Programme or FAQS Tickets: Entry all areas with full Convention Wristband:  Full Day or Week-End tickets from £12 to £26 In-Advance (£15 - £30 On-the-Day).  Trade Show Only - £5 on-the-day.. All delegates must wear a wristband for admission.  Website wristband bookings close 2nd April.  Thereafter wristbands can only be purchased at...
  12. National Bee Unit identification poster These resources can be ordered direct from the NBU office by contacting nbu@apha.gsi.gov.uk - but to save time and money you can also download the files above and print them yourselves PLEASE DOWNLOAD THE ASIAN HORNET IDETIFICATION APP HERE FOR FREE
  13. Please save, print and display this wherever you think it would be useful
  14. Each BBKA branch or Area Association is being asked to set up a team that can assist with local requests for help in identifying Asian Hornets. We thank the AHATs in Devon for their guidance and forethought with this.  Please download the file for full details.      download file O Please find a written overview from the Government of all the relevant Organisations in relation to the response on Asian Hornets.      download file
  15. DEFRA is recommending monitoring traps in all areas of the Country even where there is no Asian hornet incursion known of at present. Once an Asian hornet has been positively identified in an area then kill traps should be used. This is in the expectation that if Asian hornets are in the area then they will be trapped and identified. The by-catch in these traps will be small compared to the damage caused by the Asian hornets if the nests are not found.  Any suspected Asian Hornets should be photographed and the pictures sent to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk Download the full monitoring trap PDF here
  16. You may be wondering how Jersey beekeepers have worked out the distance they are from an Asian Hornet's nest by timing how long it takes a hornet to fly from bait to nest and back? Well it all goes back to elementary mathematics..... Speed is a measure of how quickly an object moves from one place to another. It is equal to the distance traveled divided by the time. It is possible to find any of these three values using the other two. So you know the time it takes to go back and forth from the bait and you have a guesstimate of the time at the nest which is considered a constant.  Divide the result by 2. Then use an estimate of the speed of flight of the Asian Hornet and you can work out the distance to the nest. So distance = speed x time At the moment, the estimate of speed of flight of the Asian Hornet being used is 100 metres per minute or 1.7 meters per second.  This is what works best to get them closest to the nest they are hunting. The other thing they do is that...
  17. Every year in the second week of September we hold an 'Asian Hornet Week' to raise awareness of this invasive species, this is the time of year when Asian hornets start hawking honeybees at hive entrances. The early autumn is the last chance we will have to prevent the emergence of new Asian hornet queens.  A further reminder that if we are to have any chance of stopping Asian Hornets from becoming established in the UK all Beekeepers, AHATs and local BKAs need to be prepared and spend periods of time being on the look out for Asian Hornets at apiaries throughout this autumn. Guidance found here. Please find the ASIAN HORNET IDENTIFICATION PDF HERE
  18. If you think you have seen an Asian Hornet  Take a picture and email it with details of where you saw it and your contact details and email it to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk Or simply use the Asian Hornet Watch app on your phone to send a picture and a location via GPS in the app straight to the non-native species secretariat and National Bee Unit.  For more information visit the Non Native Species Secretariat website. If it is safe to do so, you can send in a sample to the National Bee Unit for examination to confirm identity.  However, do not under any circumstances disturb or provoke an active hornets’ nest.
  19. Latest on Asian Hornet - AHAT action required Claire Hartry BBKA Trustee Anne Rowberry has attended meetings and had discussions with Nigel Semmence, Contingency Planning & Science Officer, Bee health advice service at the National Bee Unit.  This document is the summary of the protocol that has been agreed. Further information will be posted on the website as it becomes available under Services\Asian Hornet\   Here is the link direct to the web page:   https://www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-action-teams As you will read in the document, the BBKA needs all Area Associations to supply contact details to the office of their Asian Hornet Area Co-Ordinator(s) as soon as possible.  We are in the process of creating a map on the website, similar to the swarm map, to facilitate members of the public being able to contact your co-ordinator. We have also put on the website a document prepared by Nigel Semmence which gives...
  20. Become an armchair beekeeper and share in the hidden world of the honey bee. It's easy as 1, 2, 3 1. Click on your preferred location below 2. Fill in your delivery details and gift options 3. Follow the payment instructions CHOOSE YOUR LOCAL BEEKEEPER AND HIVE: Adopt a Beehive South & Central - £36 Adopt a Beehive Scotland & Northern Ireland - £36   Adopt a Beehive Wales & West - £36        Adopt a Beehive in North - £36     Adopt a Beehive in London - £36  Your virtual adoption When you Adopt a Beehive with the BBKA you are sent a ‘welcome’ box of goodies which includes: • a jar of honey, • a ‘Pocket Guide to the Honey Bee’ • a packet of pollinator-friendly wildflowers seeds • a Burt’s Bees lip balm   In addition to your three seasonal...
  21. BBKA Holds a competition every year to raise the profile of bees In 2018 this was 'Bees in Art' and the winners will be receiving a commemorative plate with their own picture printed on and a winner's certificate. In 2019 we are thinking of having a honey recipe competition! Here are our wonderful winners from 2018: Poppy Rain, 11 years William Morrish, 15 years Lauren Gorbould, 16 years
  22. 30 November 2018  9 year old Rosie Edmundson was 'over the moon' to receive the British Beekeepers Association President's Prize for 2018 during morning assembly today.  Rosie, who attends Bewdley Primary School in Worcestershire, has been collecting money this year to help honeybees. The President's Prize is given to an individual who has done something special to help bees.  Margaret Murdin, who is the BBKA's President, travelled to her school to present her with a certificate and a shopping voucher that she can use to buy herself something she really wants.  Brownie  Rosie is a keen member of her local Brownie pack and has been very concerned about endangered animals.  Last year she raised £96 to help them but this year she has concentrated on honeybees and raised £85! She has been printing her own T-shirts to sell and helped decorate a duck house with bees in a meadow for a competition she entered.  Her mum, Lynsey, said&...
  23. Link to My beekeeping diary by Connie Rogers
  24. ta.answers@bbka.org.uk
  25. michelle.walsh@bbka.org.uk
  26. Supporting an onsite apiary in a school takes an enormous amount of work, time and effort but the bees can offer so much to the children in ways that are immeasurable The excellent Heron Hill Apiary, supported by Kendal Beekeepers started 3 years ago. Jacqui Cottam, being involved with bees since she was twelve, thought to bring bees and children together would be a great step for her school. She had a lot of support from her local beekeeping association and this has resulted in successful completion of their first ten Junior Assessments in June 2018. Jacqui said: ... seven were current Heron Hill children, 8–11, and three were past pupils, so ‘bitten by the beekeeping bug’ they come back every week for bee club and have taken the certificate. The exam day went well; tough, but the children did brilliantly, even demonstrating an artificial swarm to the examiner in the practical session! I was so proud of them. They might have been standing on boxes to reach...
  27. 23 November 2018  Horticulture students from Pershore College near Evesham have started mapping out plans to transform the National Apiary at the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) headquarters at Stoneleigh Park in Warwickshire. The work is happening because of a very generous legacy left to us by a keen beekeeper. You can read the college news release below:  Local horticulture students are helping transform the apiary at the National Beekeeping Centre in Warwickshire to inspire a new generation of beekeepers – thanks to a Coventry man’s legacy. The BSc Horticulture students from Pershore College, near Evesham, part of WCG, have been tasked with coming up with a new design for the apiary, which is home to some 500,000 honey bees, so that it can be opened up to the local community. The apiary is part of the National Beekeeping Centre established by the British Beekeepers’ Association (BBKA) at Stoneleigh Park in 1965, and is currently only used for b...
  28. Rosie Edmundson, a 9 year old from Bewdley in Worcestershire, has raised the amazing sum of £85 to help the BBKA fund research into how to help honeybees. She’s a keen member of her local Brownie pack and has been very concerned about endangered animals. Rosie and her little sister Last year Rosie raised £96 to help them but this year she has concentrated on honeybees and raised £85! She has been printing her own T-shirts to sell and helped decorate a duck house with bees in a meadow for a competition she entered. The BBKA would like to thank her very much for doing all this - she’s an absolute star! You can see from the pictures how much  she radiates the joy she gets from raising funds for nature and she doesn’t leave her little sister out! You can help us with the work we do by donating via our JustGiving page . Rosie and her t-shirt design and their wonderful duck house Honeybees are under threat Honey bees are under threat and...
  29. 22 October 2018 The annual honey survey by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) shows honeybees survived the difficult climate this year and produced a crop of honey a third bigger than last years. The results show that the honey crop was, on average, just over 30lbs of honey per hive, or just under 14 kilos  across England and Wales. It was a difficult year in climactic terms with a very cold snap nicknamed the Beast from the East halting the honey gathering in Spring and then a long drought in many parts of the country which meant plants with shallow roots stopped producing nectar.  While regions which traditionally have the biggest crop of honey, the East and South East, saw increases to 41 and 36lbs of honey per hive respectively, Welsh beekeepers reported an exceptionally improved crop, with over double the amount of honey compared to last year at 31.4lbs per hive, thanks largely to the long, warm summer. Calwyn Glastonbury, a beekeeper in the Usk Valley who...
  30. 3 December 2018 If you are in Birmingham in December, check out the video billboard appeal about Adopt a Beehive. It's message is that you don't have to be a superhero to help honeybees.  It was put together by final year media students at Winchester University. It's on Oxford Street near the Bullring Shopping Centre.   It will run throughout December.  www.bbka.org.uk/adopt-a-beehive-info  -ends- 
  31. 15th October 2018 It's just been confirmed that two Asian Hornets have been found in Dungeness in Kent over the weekend. One was on ivy in someone's garden and the other was found at the Dungeness Bird Observatory.  Members of the Animal and Plant Health Agency have visited the sites to collect the hornets and Bee Inspectors are in the area setting traps.  The first hornet was found in a garden and lured down to a bait tray on Saturday 13th.  The second Asian Hornet ( in the main picture on this page ) was seen feeding on ivy at the Dungeness Bird Observatory on Sunday 14th October and was captured.  -ends- 
  32. 11 October 2018  Parliamentary Under Secretary of State responsible for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity, Lord Gardiner, has written to BBKA President Margaret Murdin to thank the BBKA for raising awareness about Asian Hornets. 6 nests have been destroyed since 2016 and most were identified by vigilant beekeepers. The letter also says Lord Gardiner is 'very encouraged' that some of our "most concerned members have initiated Asian Hornet Action Teams to help beekeepers take samples/photographs of hornets to enable the National Bee Unit (NBU) to act swiftly to deal with this pest." The Minister points out that October is when any nests are reaching maturity and sending out foundress Queens to raise the next generation of hornets. This increase in activity as the leaves are falling off the trees should make their nests more prominent.  Lord Gardiner says thanks for your continued vigilance and please pass on any sightings as quickly as possible to the NBU.  -ends- ...
  33. This is the latest version of the BBKA Constitution 2018.
  34. 4th October 2018 The island of Jersey's local Asian Hornet Hunters,  with the assistance of trainee hunters from across the UK,  have found, destroyed or prevented 52 primary and secondary Asian Hornet nests so far this year with almost equal numbers being in trees and buildings.  1.5 million hornets  Nigel Errington, the recently appointed States of Jersey Asian Hornet Co-ordinator, estimates that "thee 52 nests would have produced around 10,400 queens (based on the generally accepted figure of 200 queens produced by each nest).  "Given the high winter mortality of queens and if only 2.5% survived the winter this would have potentially led to Jersey having 260 nests next year.  "Based on 260 nests having an average hornet content, at high season, of 6000 hornets per nest this would mean they could, hypothetically, produce a hornet count over a year of around 1.5 Million hornets! Each hornet starts life as a grub who only eats protein in the form of...
  35. 1st October 2018   A second Asian Hornet nest has been destroyed in Hampshire. This one was near Brockenhurst in the south of the county.  This brings the total number of nests destroyed in England over two years to 6.  National Bee Unit (NBU) inspectors are still investigating reports of Asian Hornets in the Southampton area and in the Guildford area.  It's very important that members of the public and beekeepers keep alert for any unusual visitors to their gardens. The weather is still warm enough for bees to fly and so that means that wasps and hornets can also keep flying to gather food.  The first nest in New Alresford in Hampshire was discovered when a member of the public told a beekeeper that there were some 'very funny looking wasps' on the rotting fruit in the orchard. They turned out to be Asian Hornets so clearly rotting fruit will attract them as will prey like wasps and bees who are gathering nectar from ivy at the moment.  The NBU...
  36. 29 September 201 An Asian Hornet nest found after a member of the public spotted one in New Alresford in Hampshire has been found and destroyed and there has been another confirmed sighting at Brockenhurst in Hampshire.  Meon Valley Beekeepers who have hives in that area have also reporting sightings in Lymington on the coast and said local beekeepers are helping staff from the NBU to track down the nest. They report that the team have drones and thermal imaging equipment as well.  There are also reported sightings in and around Southampton so if any beekeepers have hives in that area it would be good if they could set out monitoring traps and keep a watch.  Current situation Defra said that to date, there have been 9 confirmed sightings of the Asian Hornet in England and five nests have been destroyed.  7 of these sightings occurred this year and you can find all the locations on the BBKA Asian Hornet Map www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-map An individual...
  37. 21st September 2018 The picture above shows the second nest found at Fowey in Cornwall today by bee inspectors and destroyed. Defra says a hunt for further nests is continuing aided by local beekeepers.   Here is the press release about it available on the government website: 
    Asian hornet: Second Fowey nest destroyed A second nest in Fowey, Cornwall, has been destroyed and the public are asked to remain vigilant for Asian hornets. Published 21 September 2018 From: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Lord Gardiner of Kimble Asian hornet hawking honey bees The National Bee Unit has located and destroyed a second Asian hornet nest in Fowey, Cornwall. The Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than a bee. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees. Investigation work...
  38. Adopt a Beehive  - Sponsored by Burts Bees Cost: Free.  Supplied FOC by the BBKA for any event you are attending. Size: A4 3 Fold  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Allotment Beekeeping (L015) Cost: £0.07 each Size: A4 3 Fold  Edition: February 2012  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Asian Hornet Leaflet NNNS (Laminated) Cost: Free Size: A4   Edition: 2018  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Bees, Neighbours & Siting an Apiary (L011) Cost: £0.12 each Size: DL 4 Fold  Edition: June 2012  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Collecting a Swarm (L004) Cost: Free Size: A4 3 Fold  Edition: May 2012  ____________________________________________________...
  39. 17 September 2018 You may be wondering how Jersey beekeepers have worked out the distance they are from an Asian Hornet's nest by timing how long it takes a hornet to fly from bait to nest and back? Well it all goes back to elementary mathematics..... Speed is a measure of how quickly an object moves from one place to another. It is equal to the distance traveled divided by the time. It is possible to find any of these three values using the other two. So you know the time it takes to go back and forth from the bait and you have a guesstimate of the time at the nest which is considered a constant.  Divide the result by 2. Then use an estimate of the speed of flight of the Asian Hornet and you can work out the distance to the nest. So distance = speed x time At the moment, the estimate of speed of flight of the Asian Hornet being used is 100 metres per minute or 1.7 meters per second.  This is what works best to get them closest to the nest they are hunting. The other thi...
  40. 10 September 2018 Two more sites where an Asian Hornet has been found and confirmed emerged today. Liskeard in Cornwall and the city of Hull. Surveillance activity at both sites is underway.  The National Bee Unit has called for the public to report any suspected Asian Hornets after two further confirmed sightings. At this stage, there is no evidence to suggest that the Cornwall and Hull sightings are linked.  You can find a map of all the Asian Hornet incursions here:  https://www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-map The Asian Hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than bee. Although like all wasps they can repeat sting.  However, they do pose a risk to honeybees and work is already underway to identify any nests in the Liskeard and Hull areas, which includes deploying bee inspectors to visit local beekeepers and setting up monitoring traps. They are monitoring a 1-2km radius around both sitings.  The hornets in Fo...
  41. September 7 2018 An Asian Hornet nest has been found in Fowey in Cornwall and destroyed by bee inspectors. It was on Friday 31st August a beekeeper in the Fowey area found 2 Asian Hornets in a trap he'd set up near his beehives. They were positively identified by the Non Native Species Secretariat and a surveillance zone was set up on Tuesday (Sept 4). Killing traps and feeding traps with meat and sweet baits were deployed and there was a lot of  hornet activity around them. By timing their visits back to the bait, inspectors from the National Bee Unit were able to track them back to their nest.  The latest nest found on Jersey ( above )  The nest was detected on Thursday (Sept 6) and destroyed in the evening, when the hornets would have returned to the nest, by using CO2 gas to carry an active ingredient called bendiocarb. The nest was removed this morning at 0700.  It is described as a small nest, about the size of a child's football, and was situated about...
  42. The UK is on high alert in 2019 after discoveries of Asian Hornet nests taking place in 2018. Here are all the details of sightings in the UK over the last 3 years. Life cycle of Asian hornet - for more information about key times of the year to be vigilant PLEASE DONATE TO HELP SAVE HONEYBEES 
  43. 4 September 2018 An Asian Hornet was found in a beekeepers monitoring trap in Fowey near the south coast of Cornwall on Friday. Bee Inspectors have been carrying out surveillance and monitoring since, the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) said. It follows an earlier sighting in Lancashire earlier this year. It was first seen in Jersey in 2016, and has since been seen in north Devon. While the sting from an Asian hornet poses no more threat than to humans than a honey bee, they are extremely defensive of their nests and have a voracious appetite for insects that could cause harm to our ecosystem.  Well-established protocol Nicola Spence, from Defra, said a "well-established protocol" was in place. She said: "That's why we are taking swift and robust action to locate and investigate any nests in the south Cornwall area following this confirmed sighting. "Following the s...
  44. New guidelines for doctors from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) say they should tell patients to use honey first when they have a cough. This is based on 3 studies that showed honey reduces symptoms by 2 points on a 7 point scale. Honey and over-the-counter medicines should be the first line of treatment for most people with coughs, new guidelines recommend.  Antibiotic resistance This is intended to help tackle the problem of antibiotic resistance. Overusing antibiotics is making infections harder to treat, by creating drug-resistant superbugs.  A hot drink of milk and honey is a very effective remedy for a sore throat.  And honey can be combined also with lemon and ginger for coughs and a sore throat.   Patients are advised to use honey and over-the-counter medicines containing pelargonium, guaifenesin or dextromethorphan and wait for symptoms to improve, before going to a GP.  Most coughs are caused by viruses, which cannot be trea...
  45. NOTE: Anyone sighting an Asian hornet on the UK mainland must report it to the National Bee Unit at this email: alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk and they will decide what action to take.  Judith Norman, the first volunteer from the mainland to go to help Jersey Beekeepers deal with overwhelming number of calls about Asian Hornets on the island, has written a blog about it:  20 August 2018 Earlier this month, Diane Roberts sent an email suggesting that beekeepers go to help out in Jersey because the Asian hornets were multiplying at such a rate that local beekeepers were swamped with the workload. At first, I felt awfully noble dashing to their rescue, but I have a confession to make: it turned out to be the most fun I have had in ages. I got thoroughly hooked on the thrill of the chase, as well as the camaraderie of working alongside like-minded people who enjoyed using their wits to overcome every type of obstacle one could imagine. Locating the nests was our only task; as s...
  46. Saturday 18th August 2018          The British Beekeepers Association ( BBKA) which represents more than 25,000 beekeepers is celebrating National Honeybee Awareness Day on August 18th by asking the public to make sure they plant for pollinators. The recent hot, dry weather has stressed bees as plants dried up and stopped producing nectar and pollen. Plants that traditionally help pollinators at this time of year are Asters, Michaelmas Daisy, Catmint, Cosmos, Ox-eye Daisies and Goldenrod. Climbers include Autumn Clematis , Black-eyed Susan Vine, Common Ivy and Passion Flower. Honeybee on Passion Flower You can help in the early part of next year to make sure that all pollinators have a good start by planting Cyclamen, Hellebore, Snowdrops, Winter Crocus,  Winter Jasmine, Winter honeysuckle, and Winter Flowering Cherry.   If you would like to support honeybees you can Adopt a Beehive with the BBKA near you and sup...
  47. BBC Countryfile live, Blenheim Palace, August 2018 by Suzanne Bennett, Trustee  The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) stand at the BBC Countryfile Live show at Blenheim Palace had more than 25,000 visitors over the 4 day event. It took place in the grounds of Blenheim Palace in August and was a great success.  The national Shows Committee under Clive Joyce's lead included Gordon Robbins, Douglas Nethercleft, Brian Donley, Liz and Steve Bates, Eileen Joyce plus Trustees Stephen Barnes and Suzanne Bennett.  Volunteer Area Association stewards from Oxfordshire and neighbouring counties joined in to meet our charitable objects to further and promote the craft of beekeeping and to educate the public in the importance of bees in the environment.  Stewards included Dean Forest Beekeepers Simon Burke and his 13 year old daughter Emily who is studying for the Basic Assessment in Beekeeping: "I learnt a bit more about beekeeping and I think people have been...
  48. The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) is very fortunate in being part of a brand new, exciting project to look at the health of honeybees after exposure to chemicals, involving many European countries and funded by the EU.  The project, named PoshBee (pan-European assessment, monitoring and mitigation of stressors on the health of bees) has 9 million Euros to boost global bee health. It is designed to determine the exposure of bees to a range of chemicals and assess the level of pests, diseases and nutritional status and the impacts these may have on the health of honeybees, bumblebees and solitary bees in a field realistic way rather than laboratory studies.  Beekeepers will be paid to take part Pam Hunter, BBKA Trustee in charge of research projects, said "This is going to be a wonderful opportunity for some of our members to take part in real scientific experiments and initially we need 30 hives in two sites in Kent and in Berkshire or Oxfordshire fro...