BBKA News Feed

  1. Friday 25 Sept 2020  The 2020 BBKA Honey Survey is ready for your answers. Just click the link: https://wh1.snapsurveys.com/s.asp?k=160092551774 It's a quick survey to do that gives us an idea of the areas that favoured our honeybees in the past season. You can give your answer for the quantity of honey you have harvested in lbs or kgs.  We also get an idea of how many of you are expanding your apiaries and trying to take small colonies through the winter.  -ends- 
  2. Monday 24 Sept 2020 BBKA Chair, Anne Rowberry, says thanks for a successful Asian Hornet Week in which we have seen the first Asian Hornet nest of 2020 located and destroyed:  "As we come to the end of a very successful BBKA Asian Hornet Week I hope you have enjoyed reading and viewing all the resources that have been available on the BBKA website and our social media channels.  "I would like to thank our Patron, Jimmy Docherty, for supporting us and the NBU for sharing the launch of their new video and Rebecca Clarkson for liaising, sharing links with the NBU and helping to compile the programme.  "We are also grateful to the researchers who contributed their photos, videos and experience. Peter Kennedy for the information about his recent research trip to Jersey to test the small, new radio tags and Prof Xesus Feas for sharing his work from Spain. Xesus started out week with an excellent video and continued to share short clips and photos. Thank you to Katy and...
  3. Lead rain after the Notre Dame cathedral fire, and how honey bee colonies map this contamination By J. van der Steen PhD - AlveusAB Consultancy, The Netherlands - The international INSIGNIA group Honey bee colonies are well equipped as bio samplers of contaminants in the environment, and how beekeepers can cooperate optimally with scientists to map this contamination is currently being studied at the European Union level in the Insignia citizen science project. Regularly, new studies are published about how honey bees and hive products can be applied to detect environmental contaminants. This is a very promising development. Apiculture is a world-wide activity and with adequate tools and the help of apiculturist citizen science, a world-wide network can be built to search for contaminants. An interesting study was published recently in July 2020. Kate Smith and co-workers published the article Honey maps the Pb fallout from the 2019 fire at Notre Dame cathedral, Paris: a geochemic...
  4. Lead rain after the Notre Dame cathedral fire, and how honey bee colonies map this contamination By J. van der Steen PhD - AlveusAB Consultancy, The Netherlands - The international INSIGNIA group Honey bee colonies are well equipped as bio samplers of contaminants in the environment, and how beekeepers can cooperate optimally with scientists to map this contamination is currently being studied at the European Union level in the Insignia citizen science project. Regularly, new studies are published about how honey bees and hive products can be applied to detect environmental contaminants. This is a very promising development. Apiculture is a world-wide activity and with adequate tools and the help of apiculturist citizen science, a world-wide network can be built to search for contaminants. An interesting study was published recently in July 2020. Kate Smith and co-workers published the article Honey maps the Pb fallout from the 2019 fire at Notre Dame cathedral, Paris: a geochemic...
  5. BBKA's YouTube Channel is available here  There are videos about Asian hornets, a message from patron Jimmy Doherty, and a collection of other videos. There are a few short videos of practical beekeeping help listed below. This video set will be added to, so please subscribe to the YouTube Channel. Practical Beekeeping - How & why to move frames in a Super Practical Beekeeping - How to judge if uncapped honey is ready for extraction Practical Beekeeping - Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus
  6. Monday 14 September 2020  The Gosport Asian Hornets were the first confirmed in 2020 and their nest has been located and destroyed. The hornets were first reported flying around a bunch of grapes in an area north of Gosport in Hampshire. Bee inspectors set up monitoring traps and tracked the hornets to an apple tree.  The nest has now been dealt with by the Animal and Plant Health Agency ( APHA) National Wildlife Management Centre.  Inspectors are monitoring for any other Asian Hornets.  -ends- 
  7. Monday 24 Sept 2020 BBKA Chair Anne Rowberry says thanks for a successful Asian Hornet Week in which we have seen the first Asian Hornet nest of 2020 located and destroyed:  "As we come to the end of a very successful BBKA Asian Hornet Week I hope you have enjoyed reading and viewing all the resources that have been made available on the BBKA website.  "I would like to thank our Patron, Jimmy Docherty, for supporting us and the NBU for sharing the launch of their new video and Rebecca Clarkson for liaising, sharing links with the NBU and helping to compile the programme. "We are also grateful to the researchers who contributed their photos, videos and experience. Peter Kennedy for the information about his recent research trip to Jersey to test the small new radio tags and Xesus Feas for sharing his work from Spain. Xesus started our week with an excellent video and continued to share short clips and photos. Thank you to Katy and Epping Forest for linking the BBKA site...
  8. Urban bees – can businesses help through green infrastructure? In this study we focus on honeybees and other pollinators in an urban landscape. The central point of the study are the Grey Street Gathering planters: two small flowerbeds that are seasonally installed in the very heart of Newcastle upon Tyne. Apart from the social and economical benefits this novel green space brings, we aim to establish whether small sites like this can have an impact on urban pollinators. In order to do so, we monitored 14 urban flower beds of different sizes in Newcastle. In addition, we also monitored two rural sites for comparison. At each site, we identified the plants in flower, counted the numbers of floral units per plant species and observed which insects (and how many) were visiting the flowers. An overview of the sites is given in Table 1. In addition to the field work we also analysed honey samples from a selection of urban and rural hives and identified the pollen in this honey. &nb...
  9. An extract from the blog article by Peter Davies which can be read in full here https://aphascience.blog.gov.uk/2020/09/11/asian-hornet/ Dealing with an incursion When a report comes in with a photograph that can be clearly identified as an Asian hornet, the NBU local contingency operation swings into action. Firstly, the local inspector will head to the location to try and collect a sample hornet to send to FERA science at Sand Hutton for a formal identification and possible genetic analysis. Secondly, a small team of 4- 6 inspectors and an incident commander assemble at the location to start the ground work to enable monitoring and tracking operations to commence.  This will involve door to door visits with information sheets to gain the public’s help and support as we may need access to gardens, private property and grounds as well as public spaces. The team need to familiarise themselves with the local area, terrain and locations of amenities services such as hospi...
  10. 10 Sept 2020 The first Asian Hornet of 2020 has been confirmed in Gosport in Hampshire. Beekeepers and members of the public were today asked to remain vigilant. The National Bee Unit has confirmed the sighting of Asian Hornets on a bunch of grapes in an area near Gosport. Live tracking of the hornets is underway and they hope to find the nest soon. The Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than our native wasps and hornets. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees.  This is the first confirmed UK sighting since October 2019, when two related nests were detected and destroyed near Christchurch, Dorset. DNA tests on those nests and two others found in 2019 have shown that the queens all came from France.  Defra’s Chief Plant and Bee Health Officer Nicola Spence said: "By ensuring we are alerted to possible sightings as early as possible, we can take swift and effective action to stamp out the threat posed by...
  11. Honeybee Entrance Monitor System Cwyn Solvi – Queen Mary University of London   The main aim of this project was to develop an entrance monitoring system that can track individual honeybees entering and exiting their hive. We also wanted the system able to be used with a variety of insects, cost under £250 per unit, and be user friendly enough so that researchers at all levels can utilise the system. Below I describe how my collaborators and I have accomplished these goals. The System  Our design utilizes the Raspberry Pi microcomputer system, and consists of a single Raspberry Pi microcomputer, a Raspberry Pi camera, and an external hard drive to store the photos taken. These items together cost around £150. The additional cost of an encasement for weather protection, utilizing 3D printing, should cost no more than £25. My collaborator, Dr Tim Gernat (US/Germany) wrote the Linux-based software (adapted from his previous software for trafficking s...
  12. Resources for Asian hornet week Please share these on social media and your association websites. Hover over the image and right click, and choose file save as. Follow us on social media and share our posts during Asian hornet week to help reach more people.  https://twitter.com/britishbee https://www.facebook.com/TheBritishBeekeepersAssociation/ https://www.instagram.com/britishbeekeepers/ This is a link to a PDF for an Asian Hornet banner we designed in the office and have used at the Asian hornet conference in 2020. This is shown below. You can use the pdf to have your own banner printed by downloading it to your computer and then uploading it to this website. Banners are in the region of £30/40 pounds - https://www.solopress.com/roller-banners/ (other websites are available!) This is the  PDF file of the latest banner used  Asian Hornet Watch app for iPhone Asian Hornet Watch app for android BBKA YouTube Channel will have...
  13. Correspondence Courses Payment
  14. Competition for best photo of a hornet Prize from Thorne Beekeeper Supplies - Voucher for £100 for winning entry Any form of hornet (European,  Asian or Wasps) and this includes their nests or any gadget you've created to help your bees deal with them. Photos should be of a good quality resolution. All entries may be used on the website, social media or the BBKA News with credit.  Enter by sending your photo in to Julie.Horbury@bbka.org.uk with the subject Photo Competition Deadline 30th September 2020.  Judged by a panel at the start of October. Winner to be announced on the website by middle of October.
  15. This was sent as an email to all Area Association and Branch Secretaries, for them to share this information with their members: At the ADM,  delegates passed a resolution to raise the awareness of the importance of trees for pollinators and support education of planners etc so more appropriate trees could be planted and maintained in the future. We have become aware of the DEFRA consultation on the England tree strategy. A BBKA response has been drafted and is attached for your information and assistance.  The consultation closes on the 12th of September. I am encouraging you as Associations or individuals to complete this consultation if you can, so Tree planting and management in the future has an input from those with a care for bees and pollinators in general. https://consult.defra.gov.uk/forestry/england-tree-strategy/  Kind regards Richard Bond BBKA Trustee See attached PDF for BBKA's response
  16. Dr Nicholas Balfour and colleagues at Sussex University were recipients of funding from BBKA in 2018 for an unusual and interesting project on building an online data base of pollinator interactions.  This is intended to be open access when it becomes active (hopefully later in 2020) so that anyone can search it for any plant and any pollinator.  Lockdown has slowed up the completion of this work but the group have managed to prepare a paper for publication and there is a description of the work here. The Database of Pollinator Interactions (DoPI) The importance of flower-insect interactions in maintaining global biodiversity, ecosystem resilience and agricultural output is well established. However, significant concerns remain about pollinator and plant populations declines and shrinking distributions. For example, more than 40 British bee, wasp and butterfly species have become extinct in the last two centuries 1. While many potential causes have been identified, the...
  17. Making Experts: A Post-War Decline From the mid-1950s, the wartime boom in beekeeping went into decline. The number of candidates attempting the Intermediate and Senior examinations was few and the pass rates were low. The system of visiting experts was phased out and county council beekeeping services declined. Full-time posts were replaced by part-time posts and eventually these disappeared. Local associations picked up responsibility for running courses of instruction and, to some extent, the preparation for written examinations, but this was variable from one county to another. More experts were needed who could construct courses and teach.   Greater support for candidates In 1972 the Examinations Board issued a list of recommended reading for prospective candidates; it is hard to imagine there not being one previously. In 1975 the name was changed to the Examination and Education Board and this endured until 1988, but there was no noticeable improvement in the pass rate d...
  18. BBKA Experts: Dealing with Disease The Technical Education Act of 1889 enabled the BBKA and county associations to gain recognition and obtain grants from the newly formed education authorities for its educational work. This included the funding of visiting experts. A survey conducted in 1894 by the BBKA revealed that 34 out of 51 English, 2 out of 12 Welsh and 4 out of 33 Scottish counties were making grants to beekeeping associations.   Expert exam results, including foul brood, as published in the British Bee Journal. Note: The British Bee Journal is available here http://www.survivorlibrary.com/library-download/8-category/14-library-bee-journal-british  This is from the January 1893 edition.  The reader may presume that those days of beekeeping were free from disease, but this was not so. The following are extracts from the minutes and reports of the Bristol, Somersetshire and South Gloucestershire Association:   2 March 1893: ‘it was...
  19. BBKA History - Making of experts is an article in three parts by BBKA Past President David Charles. This covers the history of the examination and assessments of the BBKA. Article 1: The BBKA and the Making of Experts   By David Charles, BBKA Past President   The British Beekeepers’ Association was instituted in 1874. At this time beekeeping was generally part of the rural domestic economy for cottagers as was poultry, pigs and growing vegetables, rather than being the hobby that it is for most today.   Bees were generally kept in straw skeps or in boxes. Sons learnt from their fathers and were content to continue keeping bees in much the same way as had their forebears. Swarming was uncontrolled. Most still harvested honey by killing colonies over a pit of burning sulphur, which was not only cruel, but wasteful and inefficient. There was no public instruction, little knowledge of bee diseases and a general disregard of the value of bees as pollinators....
  20. Did you know the BBKA have a digital version of the BBKA News? It’s accessed via this link BBKANEWS.COM The username and password are shared in the paper copy of the magazine that you receive each month. These details are on the contents page at the bottom left.  You can read the current edition as well as previous copies of it going back to February 2001! You can search for articles, or just read through the current issue. This site is accessible on your mobile phone, table or computer!  These three screengrabs are from a mobile phone.  This screengrab shows the log in page for BBKA News. You get the password from inside the cover of the paper copy of the magazine underneath the contents. This shows how you read the magazine, by scrolling through the pages. This screengrab shows a search for Varroa which lists lots of results.  If you're reading it on a computer then you'll see this  (1) is to toggle the side bar. This all...
  21. If 2020 has taught us one thing - it's that life is precious and delicate. Bees pollinate billions of plants each year, including millions of agricultural crops. It is estimated bees play a key role in one out of every three bites of food we eat. Without them, many plants and crops we rely on would die off. We are hoping to raise £1000 through your kind donations to help The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) The BBKA educates and trains beekeepers of the future and supports vital research. They also work hard to raise the profile of beekeeping amongst young people through its school programme and junior certificates to ensure the next generation will be well equipped to do the important work we urgently need to continue. Thank you for your donation.
  22. Tuesday, 11th August 2020 The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) is warning beekeepers to use veterinary medicines safely, effectively and legally. In practice this means you must follow the instructions in the package leaflet unless directed otherwise by your vet.  The VMD says it has received a number of specific enquires about the use of amitraz-based products for the treatment of varroosis in the UK. Varroa treatments  There are 2 authorised amitraz-based products in the UK - Apitraz and Apivar. The VMD wants to remind beekeepers that Neither of these should be used during a honey flow or when honey supers are on the hive.  You should only use UK-authorised veterinary medicinal products to treat varroosis in honeybees, unless an appropriate authorised medicine is not available and a veterinary surgeon has prescribed a different product under the prescribing cascade.  A list of all UK-authorised products is available on the VMD's product informa...
  23. The dates for the 2021 Spring Convention are 16-18 April.
  24. Keeping bees healthy and productive requires knowledge and skill. Beekeeping is made much easier by belonging to a local Beekeepers Association where you should be given advice, tuition and support  One of the key questions you might ask is: Should I keep bees?  Why join a local association?  You will get great advice, a mentor and access to training and a library of books about beekeeping. Associations will run courses at  certain times of the year which will show you the magical world of beekeeping. By taking part in an 'Introduction to Beekeeping' course, you will understand the level of responsibility required to become a good beekeeper. Most associations support the course with a visit to a local apiary, where you can handle bees, before you make any investment in equipment and your honey bees. And you will have mentors who will help as you start to keep bees for yourself.  Courses Throughout spring and summer, depending on weathe...
  25. Thursday 30th July 2020 The PoshBee project, which the BBKA is supporting, is developing a new tool that gives an overview of the health status of beehives, involving 8 countries: Estonia, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the UK. By filling in these surveys you can help the team investigate incentives and barriers to using the new tool. Surveys are completely anonymous and take 10-15 minutes to complete. What are the benefits to beekeepers and growers? The tool will give a rapid insight into the health of the colony. Beekeepers will be assisted with early identification of beehive issues (pesticide exposure, diseases, malnutrition,etc.), while growers will be provided with information on adopting better farm management systems and more reliable honeybee pollination services. Your contribution is important! Beekeepers and growers are key to understanding motivations as well as barriers to the use of the new tool; your contribution will help us id...
  26. BBKA News Special Editions
  27. Exam Board Statement "The global outbreak of COVID-19 has meant that we have had to limit socialising and gatherings to help prevent the spread of this disease. Inevitably, this has had a huge impact on the BBKA exam system, that relies on candidates, assessors and invigilators to meet in close proximity or travel some distance away from home.  "Following the feedback from many associations and individuals on the matter, we have taken the difficult decision to cancel the BBKA assessments for the remaining part of 2020. These include Show Judge certificate in October as well as Module exams and Microscopy assessments in November.  "The main concern of the Exam Board is the safety of all candidates, assessors and invigilators. While some associations have indicated that they may be able to facilitate the Module exams, others have advised against it. We want to offer equal opportunities to all members who wish to take BBKA exams. With the current situation, however, we...
  28. Thank you for your application to join the BBKA as a direct member. Your application will be processed within the next 5 working days at which time you will be emailed an online application to complete. Should you have any enquiries in the meantime or if you do not receive the application form email within 5 working days please �contact members@bbka.org.uk
  29. Thank you for joining the BBKA as a direct member You should receive a receipt by email which includes your BDI insurance. If your email does not arrive please check your Junk / Spam folder.
  30. Membership of the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) brings many rewards We recommend, particularly if you are a new beekeeper or want to start beekeeping, that you join your local BBKA affiliated beekeeping association who can provide training and support but you are also part of the national organisation.  Partner, Junior and School memberships are also available. Education  Support and mentoring Practical teaching at the training apiary Training and education meetings Online forum for beekeeping support Beekeeping examinations, from beginner to the highest level  Insurance & Magazine £10m third party public & product liability insurance  Monthly full cover membership magazine, BBKA News, posted to you On-line BBKA News magazine archive which is fully searchable Other benefits  Annual Spring Convention and Exhibition with a full range of lectures and seminars Webshop with educational books and resources Appear on...
  31. The BBKA would like to ask the public to learn a little about the Asian hornet and how to identify it, and then report it. This invasive insect is a non-native species that can devastate the populations of all pollinators, not just honeybees. Information about identifying Asian hornets and other insects See our Asian hornet identification page  https://www.bbka.org.uk/faqs/identifying-asian-hornet Asian Hornet Lifecycle page https://www.bbka.org.uk/faqs/life-cycle-of-asian-hornet Team page https://www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-team How to ID an European hornet  http://hymettus.org.uk/downloads/Info_sheets_2010/08_Vespa_crabro_1col_infosheet.pdf Test yourself, just for fun!       BBKA ASIAN HORNET WEEK QUIZ What is size (length) of an Asian Hornet worker in the Summer? What do Asian Hornets normally use to construct their nests? How do Asian Honey bees (Apis Cerana) avoid capture by Asian Hornets ? The average life span of an As...
  32. BBKA Resources
  33. Training
  34. Module Past Papers
  35. Beekeeping Gifts
  36. 1 July 2020 The latest survey from the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) shows higher losses of 17.3% of colonies compared to last year when losses were 9%. But the losses are under the average measured across all the surveys we have carried out so far which is 18.2%.  Thank you to everyone who took part in the survey. We had around 2,600 replies online which is 10% of our membership.  The highest survival rate was in the South West ( 10.2% losses) and the worst was the South East ( 21.7% losses).  You can find more information in the latest edition of BBKA News which is available in the Members Area of the website: https://bbkanews.com/issues The survey, and results of all the questions, will be placed on our website later.  -ends- 
  37. 30 June 2020  PoshBee scientists, who are backed by the BBKA, have issued their second newsletter which shows some of the technical innovations they have made in order to study the effects of chemicals on honeybees, bumblebees and solitary bees.  The first is a clear plastic box they can place over bumblebee nests to ensure safe handling of the bees and to allow photographs to be taken of what is happening in the bumblebee nest. The second innovation is a trap fitted onto the entrance of a honeybee hive to catch dead bees when they are dragged out by the workers which will allow more accurate counting of deaths.  The third is etching serial numbers lasered onto every frame they put in a honeybee hive which allows easy identification both in the field and lab.  You can find out more about these inventions and how they are being used. -ends-
  38. The BBKA Spring Convention Programmes  The Spring Convention has been held every year since 1977 Regrettably the 2020 Spring Convention was cancelled due to the Coronavirus outbreak. 2021's Spring Convention will be 16-18 April. Mark this on your calendar now! The Convention Committee are busy investigating options including the much loved Harper Adams Convention and/or an online event, so that we are prepared for whatever the future brings.  The (cancelled) 2020 programme is available below to download and we have included the past few years too, so you can really get a flavour of what the BBKA's Spring Convention is all about.   Spring Convention 2020 Programme Spring Convention 2019 Programme Spring Convention 2018 Programme
  39. Please contact  Leigh Sidaway  02476 696679 ext 2005 
  40. 7th June 2020 The BBKA introduced Queen Rearing Courses last year to encourage people to breed their own queens. Now surveys have shown high satisfaction with the knowledge they gained. All photos by Rachel Hills The reason for doing this is to encourage beekeepers to buy bees that are  locally adapted to their area, which are successful and avoid the risk of bringing diseases into the country and into their apiaries. The most recent example of this is Chronic Bee Paralysis Virus (CBPV) which has appeared in many areas of the country and is associated with the importation of bees.  Funding was granted by Defra and late last summer 5 two-day courses with 10 beekeepers were run at four locations. Each course was taught by two Master Beekeepers, the lead tutor was Sean Stephenson. The 62 beekeepers were shown the two simple and successful methods of getting a new queen - grafting and the Miller Method, although other methods were also briefly discussed.  Eac...
  41. Wednesday 3rd June, 2020 A small nest of hornets in an outbuilding in Monmouthshire has been destroyed but Defra have not confirmed that it was an Asian Hornet nest. Beekeepers in the area are keeping an eye out for Asian Hornets.  This is the picture of the nest and hornet emerging before it was destroyed.  All beekeepers are asked to be vigilant for hornets and keep looking for nests in sheds and trees on their walks outside.  -ends- 
  42. A honeybee colony swarming is a natural process. It's the colony reproducing by the old queen leaving with some of the bees. They leave their hive and find somewhere to hang in a cluster until the scout bees decide on their new home. If you think you've got a swarm please use our Swarm Collector map to find a local beekeeper to come and remove the honeybees. The photos below have been shared by our members to show you some of the beautiful examples of swarms that you might see. Sometimes the swarm really stands out!  And sometimes not!  This swarm (photos by Joe Smith from Darlington) was almost hidden Swarms have less to land on in towns! This is not a normal bin collection! Here's a swarm on a bin being collected!  Sometimes they land on a wall Or a gate post Or on a bridge Sometimes they're huge! This photo from a member of NSBKA was he biggest swarm (and the easiest to collect) that the experienced beekeeper called o...
  43. Questions for beekeepers This page will have new questions added regularly. The questions are for beekeepers and will help provide feedback on topics and issues for those involved in beekeeping. Bookmark the page and return every month!  If you don't see the EFB question below please click this link Loading… Previous Questions Results Have you downloaded the Asian hornet app yet? It's available at the Google Play Store https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=uk.ac.ceh.hornets&hl=en_GB And on Apple store https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/asian-hornet-watch/id1161238813 Asian Hornet Week 2020 is 7-13 September Find out more  Sacbrood is a relatively common disease during the first half of the brood-rearing season and can often go unnoticed, affecting only a small percentage of the brood. It does not usually cause severe colony loss. Initially during an infection, the virus particles replicate in the developing larva, w...
  44. purpose is to raise money for a cause, charity or non-profit organization.... Events are used to increase visibility and support for an organization as well as raising funds.
  45. There are over 250 types of bees in the UK but there is only one european honey bee (Apis mellifera).  Please see below to identify what type of bee you have and who to approach for help and information.  Our members are volunteers who can only help with honey bees.  If you feel you need to have the bees destroyed please contact a local pest controller.  Bees are endangered but they are not protected. Our beekeepers are only able to help in cases of SWARMS OF HONEY BEES. See our page of photos of honeybee swarms To Jump straight to the Swarm map click here To support the work of the BBKA please DONATE STEP 1: Identifying bees If the insects are not honey bees, this part of the website shows you how to recognise other insects  and  gives some advice on what to do. Bumblebees Bumblebees are often confused with honeybees. However they are rounder, larger and furrier and come with a variety of coloured stripes across the end of their tai...
  46. I am a BBKA member who specialises in urban beekeeping and work to raise awareness of the importance of bees to our ecosystem and to help create more bee friendly areas.
  47. If you've got some honey at home, why not try a recipe with honey in. Share your photos of your honey cooking with us on social media!  East Lancashire Beekeepers Association have a page with a Honey Welsh Cakes recipe along with lots of other useful things! Pineapple and honey upside-down-cake An easy and tasty way of making the most of a large tin of pineapple found at the back of a cupboard, some imperfect honey and only 4oz of precious SR flour!  Makes 8. Two didn’t survive for photography! Ingredients: 6-8 rings of pineapple 3-8 glacé cherries (whole or halved) 6-8 dessert spoons of liquid honey 6-8 small round flan / yorkshire pudding tins, or a single swiss roll tin. A cake mix Put a dessert spoonful of honey in each tin, then a ring of pineapple and a cherry or half cherry in the centre.  If using a large baking tray, space out pineapple rings appropriately.  Top with preferred cake mix.  This was a Victoria sandwich mix...
  48. What bee is this? In summer we get many calls and questions from people with bees in their buildings, outbuildings and bird boxes. Often these turn out to be bumblebees. Step 1 - Identification As well as honeybees there are around 24 species of bumblebee and over 240 species of solitary bee in the UK. To find out what type of bees you have please see the pictures below. Honeybees There can be variation in the colour of the main body or abdomen of honeybees, from honey coloured Italian bees to very dark native Black honeybees but all will form a distinctive cluster when they have settled as a swarm. Honeybees have large hairy eyes, a furry chest or thorax and distinctive bent antennae.  d  This is a swarm of honeybees gathered on a wall. There are more pictures of swarms here honeybee swarms If you are sure they are honeybees then again follow the link at the bottom of the the BBKA website swarm page http://www.bbka.org.uk/swarm.  This allows you t...