BBKA News Feed

  1. Brownie has raised £85.00 to help the honeybees

    Rosie Edmundson, a 9 year old from Bewdley in Worcestershire, has raised the amazing sum of £85 to help the BBKA fund research into how to help honeybees. She’s a keen member of her local Brownie pack and has been very concerned about endangered animals. Rosie and her little sister Last year Rosie raised £96 to help them but this year she has concentrated on honeybees and raised £85! She has been printing her own T-shirts to sell and helped decorate a duck house with bees in a meadow for a competition she entered. The BBKA would like to thank her very much for doing all this - she’s an absolute star! You can see from the pictures how much  she radiates the joy she gets from raising funds for nature and she doesn’t leave her little sister out! You can help us with the work we do by donating via our JustGiving page . Rosie and her t-shirt design and their wonderful duck house Honeybees are under threat Honey bees are under threat and...
  2. 2018 Honey Harvest is third bigger than last years

    22 October 2018 The annual honey survey by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) shows honeybees survived the difficult climate this year and produced a crop of honey a third bigger than last years. The results show that the honey crop was, on average, just over 30lbs of honey per hive, or just under 14 kilos  across England and Wales. It was a difficult year in climactic terms with a very cold snap nicknamed the Beast from the East halting the honey gathering in Spring and then a long drought in many parts of the country which meant plants with shallow roots stopped producing nectar.  While regions which traditionally have the biggest crop of honey, the East and South East, saw increases to 41 and 36lbs of honey per hive respectively, Welsh beekeepers reported an exceptionally improved crop, with over double the amount of honey compared to last year at 31.4lbs per hive, thanks largely to the long, warm summer. Calwyn Glastonbury, a beekeeper in the Usk Valley who...
  3. 2 Asian Hornets found in 2 days at Dungeness in Kent

    15th October 2018 It's just been confirmed that two Asian Hornets have been found in Dungeness in Kent over the weekend. One was on ivy in someone's garden and the other was found at the Dungeness Bird Observatory.  Members of the Animal and Plant Health Agency have visited the sites to collect the hornets and Bee Inspectors are in the area setting traps.  The first hornet was found in a garden and lured down to a bait tray on Saturday 13th.  The second Asian Hornet ( in the main picture on this page ) was seen feeding on ivy at the Dungeness Bird Observatory on Sunday 14th October and was captured.  -ends- 
  4. Defra Minister praises beekeepers for raising alarm about Asian Hornets

    11 October 2018  Parliamentary Under Secretary of State responsible for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity, Lord Gardiner, has written to BBKA President Margaret Murdin to thank the BBKA for raising awareness about Asian Hornets. 6 nests have been destroyed since 2016 and most were identified by vigilant beekeepers. The letter also says Lord Gardiner is 'very encouraged' that some of our "most concerned members have initiated Asian Hornet Action Teams to help beekeepers take samples/photographs of hornets to enable the National Bee Unit (NBU) to act swiftly to deal with this pest." The Minister points out that October is when any nests are reaching maturity and sending out foundress Queens to raise the next generation of hornets. This increase in activity as the leaves are falling off the trees should make their nests more prominent.  Lord Gardiner says thanks for your continued vigilance and please pass on any sightings as quickly as possible to the NBU.  -ends- ...
  5. BBKA Constitution 2018

    This is the latest version of the BBKA Constitution 2018.
  6. Jersey has found 52 Asian Hornet nests so far

    4th October 2018 The island of Jersey's local Asian Hornet Hunters,  with the assistance of trainee hunters from across the UK,  have found, destroyed or prevented 52 primary and secondary Asian Hornet nests so far this year with almost equal numbers being in trees and buildings.  1.5 million hornets  Nigel Errington, the recently appointed States of Jersey Asian Hornet Co-ordinator, estimates that "thee 52 nests would have produced around 10,400 queens (based on the generally accepted figure of 200 queens produced by each nest).  "Given the high winter mortality of queens and if only 2.5% survived the winter this would have potentially led to Jersey having 260 nests next year.  "Based on 260 nests having an average hornet content, at high season, of 6000 hornets per nest this would mean they could, hypothetically, produce a hornet count over a year of around 1.5 Million hornets! Each hornet starts life as a grub who only eats protein in the form of...
  7. Second Hampshire Asian Hornet nest destroyed near Brockenhurst

    1st October 2018   A second Asian Hornet nest has been destroyed in Hampshire. This one was near Brockenhurst in the south of the county.  This brings the total number of nests destroyed in England over two years to 6.  National Bee Unit (NBU) inspectors are still investigating reports of Asian Hornets in the Southampton area and in the Guildford area.  It's very important that members of the public and beekeepers keep alert for any unusual visitors to their gardens. The weather is still warm enough for bees to fly and so that means that wasps and hornets can also keep flying to gather food.  The first nest in New Alresford in Hampshire was discovered when a member of the public told a beekeeper that there were some 'very funny looking wasps' on the rotting fruit in the orchard. They turned out to be Asian Hornets so clearly rotting fruit will attract them as will prey like wasps and bees who are gathering nectar from ivy at the moment.  The NBU...
  8. A Nest Destroyed & Another Confirmed Sighting of Asian Hornets

    29 September 201 An Asian Hornet nest found after a member of the public spotted one in New Alresford in Hampshire has been found and destroyed and there has been another confirmed sighting at Brockenhurst in Hampshire.  Meon Valley Beekeepers who have hives in that area have also reporting sightings in Lymington on the coast and said local beekeepers are helping staff from the NBU to track down the nest. They report that the team have drones and thermal imaging equipment as well.  There are also reported sightings in and around Southampton so if any beekeepers have hives in that area it would be good if they could set out monitoring traps and keep a watch.  Current situation Defra said that to date, there have been 9 confirmed sightings of the Asian Hornet in England and five nests have been destroyed.  7 of these sightings occurred this year and you can find all the locations on the BBKA Asian Hornet Map www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-map An individual...
  9. Second Asian Hornet nest at Fowey in Cornwall destroyed

    21st September 2018 The picture above shows the second nest found at Fowey in Cornwall today by bee inspectors and destroyed. Defra says a hunt for further nests is continuing aided by local beekeepers.   Here is the press release about it available on the government website: 
    Asian hornet: Second Fowey nest destroyed A second nest in Fowey, Cornwall, has been destroyed and the public are asked to remain vigilant for Asian hornets. Published 21 September 2018 From: Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs and Lord Gardiner of Kimble Asian hornet hawking honey bees The National Bee Unit has located and destroyed a second Asian hornet nest in Fowey, Cornwall. The Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than a bee. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees. Investigation work...
  10. BBKA Leaflets September 2018

    Adopt a Beehive  - Sponsored by Burts Bees Cost: Free.  Supplied FOC by the BBKA for any event you are attending. Size: A4 3 Fold  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Allotment Beekeeping (L015) Cost: £0.07 each Size: A4 3 Fold  Edition: February 2012  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Asian Hornet Leaflet NNNS (Laminated) Cost: Free Size: A4   Edition: 2018  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Bees, Neighbours & Siting an Apiary (L011) Cost: £0.12 each Size: DL 4 Fold  Edition: June 2012  ______________________________________________________________________________________________ Collecting a Swarm (L004) Cost: Free Size: A4 3 Fold  Edition: May 2012  ____________________________________________________...
  11. Spring Convention 2019

    12, 13, 14 April 2019 Harper Adams University Newport Shropshire TF10 8NB The national beekeeping event of the year - open to all Lectures, Workshops & Seminars, Trade Show Tickets on-sale January 2019 Click here for more information
  12. Asian Hornet Flight

    17 September 2018 You may be wondering how Jersey beekeepers have worked out the distance they are from an Asian Hornet's nest by timing how long it takes a hornet to fly from bait to nest and back? Well it all goes back to elementary mathematics..... Speed is a measure of how quickly an object moves from one place to another. It is equal to the distance traveled divided by the time. It is possible to find any of these three values using the other two. So you know the time it takes to go back and forth from the bait and you have a guesstimate of the time at the nest which is considered a constant.  Divide the result by 2. Then use an estimate of the speed of flight of the Asian Hornet and you can work out the distance to the nest. So distance = speed x time At the moment, the estimate of speed of flight of the Asian Hornet being used is 100 metres per minute or 1.7 meters per second.  This is what works best to get them closest to the nest they are hunting. The other thi...
  13. Two more Asian Hornet incursions found in Liskeard & Hull

    10 September 2018 Two more sites where an Asian Hornet has been found and confirmed emerged today. Liskeard in Cornwall and the city of Hull. Surveillance activity at both sites is underway.  The National Bee Unit has called for the public to report any suspected Asian Hornets after two further confirmed sightings. At this stage, there is no evidence to suggest that the Cornwall and Hull sightings are linked.  You can find a map of all the Asian Hornet incursions here:  https://www.bbka.org.uk/asian-hornet-map The Asian Hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than bee. Although like all wasps they can repeat sting.  However, they do pose a risk to honeybees and work is already underway to identify any nests in the Liskeard and Hull areas, which includes deploying bee inspectors to visit local beekeepers and setting up monitoring traps. They are monitoring a 1-2km radius around both sitings.  The hornets in Fo...
  14. Asian Hornet nest in Fowey found & destroyed

    September 7 2018 An Asian Hornet nest has been found in Fowey in Cornwall and destroyed by bee inspectors. It was on Friday 31st August a beekeeper in the Fowey area found 2 Asian Hornets in a trap he'd set up near his beehives. They were positively identified by the Non Native Species Secretariat and a surveillance zone was set up on Tuesday (Sept 4). Killing traps and feeding traps with meat and sweet baits were deployed and there was a lot of  hornet activity around them. By timing their visits back to the bait, inspectors from the National Bee Unit were able to track them back to their nest.  The latest nest found on Jersey ( above )  The nest was detected on Thursday (Sept 6) and destroyed in the evening, when the hornets would have returned to the nest, by using CO2 gas to carry an active ingredient called bendiocarb. The nest was removed this morning at 0700.  It is described as a small nest, about the size of a child's football, and was situated about...
  15. Asian Hornet Map

    DONATE TO HELP SUPPORT HONEYBEES IN THE UK
  16. Asian Hornet trapped in Fowey

    4 September 2018 An Asian Hornet was found in a beekeepers monitoring trap in Fowey near the south coast of Cornwall on Friday. Bee Inspectors have been carrying out surveillance and monitoring since, the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra) said. It follows an earlier sighting in Lancashire earlier this year. It was first seen in Jersey in 2016, and has since been seen in north Devon. While the sting from an Asian hornet poses no more threat than to humans than a honey bee, they are extremely defensive of their nests and have a voracious appetite for insects that could cause harm to our ecosystem.  Well-established protocol Nicola Spence, from Defra, said a "well-established protocol" was in place. She said: "That's why we are taking swift and robust action to locate and investigate any nests in the south Cornwall area following this confirmed sighting. "Following the s...
  17. Use Honey first for a cough, new guidelines say

    New guidelines for doctors from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE) say they should tell patients to use honey first when they have a cough. This is based on 3 studies that showed honey reduces symptoms by 2 points on a 7 point scale. Honey and over-the-counter medicines should be the first line of treatment for most people with coughs, new guidelines recommend.  Antibiotic resistance This is intended to help tackle the problem of antibiotic resistance. Overusing antibiotics is making infections harder to treat, by creating drug-resistant superbugs.  A hot drink of milk and honey is a very effective remedy for a sore throat.  And honey can be combined also with lemon and ginger for coughs and a sore throat.   Patients are advised to use honey and over-the-counter medicines containing pelargonium, guaifenesin or dextromethorphan and wait for symptoms to improve, before going to a GP.  Most coughs are caused by viruses, which cannot be trea...
  18. Hornet Nest Hunting in Jersey

    NOTE: Anyone sighting an Asian hornet on the UK mainland must report it to the National Bee Unit at this email: alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk and they will decide what action to take.  Judith Norman, the first volunteer from the mainland to go to help Jersey Beekeepers deal with overwhelming number of calls about Asian Hornets on the island, has written a blog about it:  20 August 2018 Earlier this month, Diane Roberts sent an email suggesting that beekeepers go to help out in Jersey because the Asian hornets were multiplying at such a rate that local beekeepers were swamped with the workload. At first, I felt awfully noble dashing to their rescue, but I have a confession to make: it turned out to be the most fun I have had in ages. I got thoroughly hooked on the thrill of the chase, as well as the camaraderie of working alongside like-minded people who enjoyed using their wits to overcome every type of obstacle one could imagine. Locating the nests was our only task; as s...
  19. BBKA ask Public to Plant for Pollinators on National Honeybee Awareness Day

    Saturday 18th August 2018          The British Beekeepers Association ( BBKA) which represents more than 25,000 beekeepers is celebrating National Honeybee Awareness Day on August 18th by asking the public to make sure they plant for pollinators. The recent hot, dry weather has stressed bees as plants dried up and stopped producing nectar and pollen. Plants that traditionally help pollinators at this time of year are Asters, Michaelmas Daisy, Catmint, Cosmos, Ox-eye Daisies and Goldenrod. Climbers include Autumn Clematis , Black-eyed Susan Vine, Common Ivy and Passion Flower. Honeybee on Passion Flower You can help in the early part of next year to make sure that all pollinators have a good start by planting Cyclamen, Hellebore, Snowdrops, Winter Crocus,  Winter Jasmine, Winter honeysuckle, and Winter Flowering Cherry.   If you would like to support honeybees you can Adopt a Beehive with the BBKA near you and sup...
  20. Very successful BBKA stand at BBC Countryfile Live

    BBC Countryfile live, Blenheim Palace, August 2018 by Suzanne Bennett, Trustee  The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) stand at the BBC Countryfile Live show at Blenheim Palace had more than 25,000 visitors over the 4 day event. It took place in the grounds of Blenheim Palace in August and was a great success.  The national Shows Committee under Clive Joyce's lead included Gordon Robbins, Douglas Nethercleft, Brian Donley, Liz and Steve Bates, Eileen Joyce plus Trustees Stephen Barnes and Suzanne Bennett.  Volunteer Area Association stewards from Oxfordshire and neighbouring counties joined in to meet our charitable objects to further and promote the craft of beekeeping and to educate the public in the importance of bees in the environment.  Stewards included Dean Forest Beekeepers Simon Burke and his 13 year old daughter Emily who is studying for the Basic Assessment in Beekeeping: "I learnt a bit more about beekeeping and I think people have been...
  21. Beehives needed for exciting new study

    The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) is very fortunate in being part of a brand new, exciting project to look at the health of honeybees after exposure to chemicals, involving many European countries and funded by the EU.  The project, named PoshBee (pan-European assessment, monitoring and mitigation of stressors on the health of bees) has 9 million Euros to boost global bee health. It is designed to determine the exposure of bees to a range of chemicals and assess the level of pests, diseases and nutritional status and the impacts these may have on the health of honeybees, bumblebees and solitary bees in a field realistic way rather than laboratory studies.  Beekeepers will be paid to take part Pam Hunter, BBKA Trustee in charge of research projects, said "This is going to be a wonderful opportunity for some of our members to take part in real scientific experiments and initially we need 30 hives in two sites in Kent and in Berkshire or Oxfordshire fro...
  22. Asian Hornet Week

    Asian Hornet Week 10th - 16th September 2018 We will be holding Asian Hornet Week during 10-16 September, since this is the time of year when Asian hornets start hawking honeybees at hive entrances. The early autumn is the last chance we will have to prevent the emergence of new Asian hornet queens.  Why is Asian Hornet Week being held? The #AsianHornetWeek will hopefully encourage all beekeepers to spend several one-hour sessions looking out for Asian hornets at their apiaries during fine weather. If you pin a 'skirt' around your hives you will force Asian hornets to hawk in front of the hive rather than ambushing bees from underneath and you can see if your bees are under attack.  It will need this amount of time as, unlike in France, there are more insects in the UK because they haven’t been eaten by competing colonies of Asian Hornets, so Asian Hornets won’t be relying on the bees for protein in quite the same way. In case you do not understand why we are...
  23. Cheshire BKA wins fourth Gold Medal at RHS Tatton

    Cheshire Beekeepers Association has won its fourth Gold Medal at the RHS Tatton flower show.  Pamela Hatton, President of Cheshire BKA, said: "We are particularly pleased as growing conditions this year have been very challenging due to the hot, dry weather. Stuart Hatton did a magnificent job with the plant display. "The set-up team and the stewards all worked really hard over the five days of the show with candle-rolling, demonstrating how bees live in a modern beehive, encouraging visitors to plant for pollinators, selling honey and generally talking about bees and beekeeping. We also offered a bee quiz." A new feature this year was live demonstrations of handling bees using two hives in a netted enclosure. The demonstration hive sited next to the enclosure proved so popular it needed beekeepers in constant attendance.  Someone commented: "All those bees and not one sting all week!"  BBKA would like to congratulate Cheshire Beekeepers Association for another priz...
  24. Save The Bees NCS Grantham West

    We are NCS group participating in the social action portion of our program. We’ve taken an interest in bees and the fact that they are almost extinct. We are going to host a family fun day in hopes of raising money for our bee-free candle campaign. With the money raised from these projects we would like to donate it to a bee friendly association.
  25. BBKA Plan for Nationwide Queen Rearing Training

    25 July 2018 The British Beekeepers Association ( BBKA) which represents more than 25,000 beekeepers has set out plans for a nationwide system of training beekeepers to rear new Queen bees. There has been a lack of commercial bee breeders in the UK and a consequent reliance on imported Queens. These queens, although checked for health, are not adapted to our climate. There is an increasing interest in the qualities of native black bees too. So the BBKA initiative will start with 6 basic skills queen rearing courses - for people who can be trained to raise queens in their own branches and make them available to beekeepers needing them. It’s envisaged that a total of 72 people will be trained at this level initially. Photo credit: Bermondsey Street Bees This plan fits in nicely with the new proposals by Defra for much more reliance on good local queen supplies therefore diminishing the number of imported queens. It’s hoped that the theory sessions will sta...
  26. New BBKA Forum

    The British Beekeepers Association ( BBKA) has a new forum for members and anyone interested in asking a question about beekeeping.  There is a general bee chat and a swarm tracker page on the site plus somewhere for young beekeepers to hang out.  The forum has the same code of conduct as all our social media - you can find full details here but we expect everyone to be courteous and refrain from using derogatory language:  BBKA Code of Conduct for Social Media So far there has been question about white ghost bees which turn out to be honeybees covered in the pollen from Himalayan Balsam plants. There is no doubt that the Balsam is flowering much earlier just like everything else this summer and the drought may mean there is not much nectar produced by the plants but honeybees are still working them.  That lack of nectar production is also discussed along with advice to not take too much honey off at this stage as we are nowhere near closing up th...
  27. Project: Bees in Schools

    Bees in the curriculum will be in digital format and available on this website in November. With kind sponsorship from Suttons Seeds, it will provide teachers with all the resources they need to teach their Primary aged children about bees in the new school year. We are working hard over the Summer with our panel of teachers to test-drive materials and get the best out of the package we can. Please check back soon to see how we are getting on. For now, if you are leading any group activities over the Summer teaching kids about bees, please print out some of our children's leaflets: Click here for our 5-7y/o colouring sheet Click here for our 7-15 y/o bees quiz If you are a School and thinking of having Bees in your School please find the following thoroughly researched documents as guidelines for your planning; -  1. Managing your apiary, time commitment 2. Schools' beekeeping management plan 3. Model rules for the Apiary 4. Model risk assessment If you are from a BBKA As...
  28. "To my daughter I bequeath two stalles"

    From apiculture to beeswax, alarm pheromones to supersedure, there are many words associated with beekeeping. As part of the Oxford English Dictionary’s 90th birthday celebrations, they are launching a number of public word appeals and one of them is about beekeeping.  A number of beekeeping terms are, of course, already included in the dictionary. For example the dictionary team have recently added entries for ACARINE (a disease of honeybees caused by the mite, Acarapis woodi) and BEE-BUTT (specific to south-west England, a man-made receptacle used as a home for a colony of bees). They would love beekeepers to tell them words they use to describe a particular technique or a slang and colloquial expression that has arisen in your beekeeping community. They want to know how you use these words? Perhaps you have evidence of earlier usage? What new words and phrases are coming into use? So come on put your thinking caps on!  Did you know that the word for a skep r...
  29. Tracking Asian Hornets using Radio Telemetry

    Electronic radio tags could be used to track invasive Asian Hornets and stop them colonising the UK and killing our honeybees, new research shows.  Scientists from the University of Exeter attached tiny tags to Asian hornets, then used a tracking device to follow them to their nests at two sites in SW France and Jersey where Asian hornets are well-established.  The tags led researchers to 5 previously undetected nests.  Lead researcher, Dr Peter Kennedy, of the Environment and Sustainability Institute on the University of Exeter's Penryn campus in Cornwall said: "Our new method of tracking offers a really important tool to tackle the spread of this invader, providing an efficient means of finding hornet nests in urban, rural and wooded environments." You can read the full paper here:  https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-018-0092-9 The work was funded by Defra as part of preparation for future outbreaks of the Asian Hornet in the UK and also by South West...
  30. Kids - 7-15 years

    Bees and Honey Quiz for Children aged from 7 to under 15 years (Tick all the answers that apply and write your name, email or phone number on the back of this sheet) Click here to download and print
  31. Kids - 7 and under

    Buzz, Flutter, Buzz - for Children under the age of 7 years (Draw and colour-in a picture of a bee, a butterfly and a bumblebee, write your name, and age and ask a parent or guardian to provide their contact details on this sheet) Click here to download and print
  32. IMYB 2018

    Monday 2 July Teams arrive in the IMYB venue at Nerac in France. Our 3 English competitors are Robyn, 15, from Hexham Beekeepers Association, in Northumberland, Natalie, 13, from Calderstones School in Liverpool and May, 15, who comes from Romsey Beekeepers in Hampshire.  IMYB is an annual meeting ensured by a multinational non-profit community for young people interested in beekeeping. Even though the event started in 2010 as an initiative of a few countries from central Europe lead by the Czech Republic, it has gained a large popularity and has become the largest international meeting for young beekeepers worldwide. Young beekeepers in action. It is designed for participants in the age from 12 to 16 who compare their knowledge and skills, establish new friendships and find more about other countries and cultures during usually a four-day meeting. https://www.facebook.com/ImybInternationalMeetingOfYoungBeekeepers/ Wednesday 4th July BBKA team leader Sim...
  33. English honeybees suffered badly this winter

    The annual survey carried out by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) to measure winter survival of honeybees shows that losses almost doubled from the 13% reported in 2016/7 to 25% or a quarter of colonies being lost in 2017/8. A significant cause of the increased losses was the more severe winter with the so-called Beast from the East bringing snow to many regions in February and a further, very cold, snap with more snow in the middle of March.  This meant there was a very late start to spring this year. This delay in the start of available forage occurred at a time when colonies are at their weakest and that, undoubtedly, was a contributing factor. Beekeepers even reported that bees were venturing out only to be confined back in their hives due to the late snow.  Contributory factors  Contributory factors included weak colonies going into winter, and queens not being mated properly. Both these were caused by colonies not having a good summer in 2017.&n...
  34. Kings Cross Bee trail app goes live for the summer

    The award-winning King’s Cross (KX) Bee Trail App 2018 will be available during the school summer holidays (July 9 – September 10) appealing to adults and children interested in bees and urban forage. The tech-enabled 60 minute bee tour of King's Cross unlocks content at 7 locations about bees and how to help them, and allows you to ID and count bees as you walk. Each of the seven locations along the 2018 KX Bee Trail are marked with a Honey Club sign. A 4-digit code on each sign, tapped into the App, unlocks a bee-related activity such as counting bees or learning about the forage that bees need to survive. Once the activity is completed, the App unlocks vouchers to some of the hip restaurants and cafes* in this emerging location behind King’s Cross Station.   The KX Bee Trail App is brought to you by The Honey Club, a partnership between King’s Cross-based youth charity Global Generation and Urban Bees. It was awarded a Bees’ Needs...
  35. ADM 2019

    ADM 2019 - Saturday 12th January 2019 The final pack will be published here by 4.30pm, Friday 16th November 2018 latest.   In the meantime some draft sections, which are likely to differ from the final versions only in terms of page numbering and indexing are available : 1. Draft ADM Pack Section 1 - Reports.  Download here. 2. Draft ADM pack Section 2 - Financial reports:  report 1 Download here                                                                        report 2  Download here 3. Draft ADM Pack Section 3 - Nominations & Propositions.  Download here Notification letter v2 from Stephen Barnes, Chair of Governance & Standing Orders Committee Guidelines for BBKA 2019 ADM Meeting – Nominations & Propositions Trustee Nomination Form Exa...
  36. Why bees need trees? - a blog by Brigit Strawbridge

    I’ve just returned home from a lovely long woodland walk. I walk as often as I can and almost always take my camera with me. I can pretty much guarantee - from March through till mid September, and sometimes beyond - that when I walk in the woods the understory, edges and clearings will be ‘abuzz’ with numerous bee species as they enjoy the foraging and nesting opportunities afforded by this wonderful diverse habitat. I'm absolutely fascinated by bees; from the different frequencies at which they buzz, their purpose in life and the challenges I face trying to identify them – to their life cycles, behavioural traits and the myriad relationships they have built up over the millennia with flowering plants. I cannot imagine what the world would be like without bees. In fact a world without bees is, quite simply, unimaginable. Bees as Pollinators The unique relationship between pollinators and flowering plants has been evolving for over 100 million yea...
  37. Epping Forest beekeeper gets British Empire Medal in Queen's Birthday Honours

    Congratulations to Ted who was recognised not only for his beekeeping but also for his voluntary work.  In Aprll last year, Ted and son Mark Gradosielski took the above shot at Everest Base Camp – on a Rotary Club trip to help redecorate an orphanage in Kathmandu and trek to base camp with 9 school kids from Hoddesdon. He became President of the Rotary Club in Hoddesdon in 2016.  At the end of 2017, Ted was made a Liveryman in the City of London joining the Wax Chandlers who have always had a close relationship with the British Beekeepers Association.  Ted says he has concentrated on rearing gentle Queens whose workers will not sting beginner beekeepers.  The letter informing him of his award came on 3rd May from the Cabinet Office. Ted said:  "I am absolutely delighted and totally surprised! Never had a clue that a group of people thought me worthy of such an honour. "My most sincere thank you goes to all those that submitted answers to the ques...
  38. Policies and Procedure

    Risk Assessments Explanation of risk codes on risk assessments - download Use of Closed Observation Hives at Public Events - download Use of Apiary for Training  - download Running a Honey Show  - download BBKA Safeguarding policy Safeguarding, child protection and vulnerable adults. Policy and procedures - download Alcohol and drugs policy - download Whilstleblowing policy - download
  39. BBKA says "plant or protect" for World Bee Day

    There are around 20,000 identified species of bees but Apis Mellifera, honeybees, are the only managed insects in the world, unique in providing honey for human consumption.  The health of honeybees is often taken as an indicator of the state of our natural world. It is part of a natural pattern that some colonies of bees won’t survive through the winter, but this year does seem to have been especially bad, in some cases, with up to half of all colonies being lost. Photo by Iolo Penri The weather, of course, plays a huge part in this, and signs are that it was the cold spring and summer last year, rather than the cold winter most recently, which might be to blame for poor over-winter survival rates across bee colonies. If it is an especially wet and windy spring, the queen bee may not be fertilised properly, so by the time spring comes the following year she is unable to lay eggs to bring new life to the hive and the colony dwindles out. Plant or protect This makes it...
  40. 10 Favourite Flowers to attract Honey Bees

    You may only have a small garden but there are flowers you can plant to help our bees throughout the year.  Many of the hedgerows and verges have disappeared and parts of the countryside are like green deserts with very few wild flowers.  Bees need pollen and nectar to supply them with protein and carbohydrates.  Small rural and urban gardens can offer a great food source for all our pollinators and still look superb. Click here to access the leaflet.
  41. BBKA asks beekeepers to look for Asian Hornets

    "There has been a sighting of an Asian Hornet in Bury, which was transported there from a farm in Lincoln.  "The hornet was a Queen and was spotted but not captured and has flown free to start a nest and rear a new colony. "Please can every beekeeper monitor the insects in their garden, allotment or hedgerows, it is best if you spend about 15 minutes or longer  looking at one area as insects can come and go quite frequently. "If members use a monitoring trap, make sure it is not a killing trap, please check it daily, release the good insects after making sure that an Asian Hornet is not there. How to identify Asian Hornet "In Spring the preferred food is carbohydrates, so bait your trap accordingly but do remember not to use anything your own bees would eat. "If you can identify the insects trapped it would help but if you cannot, take a photograph with your phone. "If you do see an Asian Hornet on a hedgerow, again take a picture but make sure that you follow its flig...
  42. Honey Bee Swarms

    Honey Bee Swarms What is a swarm? Why do bees swarm?  Click here to download the leaflet.
  43. Leaflets Available to download or purchase

  44. EU bans neonicotinoid pesticides on outdoor crops

    27 April 2018 EU member states have voted by qualified majority to ban the use of neonicotinoid pesticides on outdoor crops. The vote follows a report from the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) which found that the pesticides posed a threat to many species of bees, no matter where or how they were used in the outdoor environment. Martin Smith, Director of Communications for the BBKA said: "We support this ban but we must be alert to what farmers will use instead on their outdoor crops. "The position of the British Beekeepers Association has long been to support the banning of these long lasting systemic pesticides, unless their use can be shown not to harm both honey and other bees as well as the environment." EFSA study "The European Food Safety Authority sponsored research into their effects and this was published last year.  As a result, the UK government changed its stance from opposing the ban to supporting it, based on the sound scientific evidence that eme...
  45. Asian Hornet Traps

    At the moment DEFRA is recommending monitoring traps in all areas of the Country where there is no Asian hornet incursion. Once an Asian hornet has been positively identified in an area then kill traps should be used. This is in the expectation that if Asian hornets are in the area then they will be trapped and identified. The by-catch in these traps will be small compared to the damage caused by the Asian hornets if the nests are not found.  Any suspected Asian Hornets should be photographed and the pictures sent to alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk Download the full PDF  
  46. Beekeepers grateful member of public spotted Asian Hornet

    Statement  The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) is disappointed to hear of the first sighting of the Asian Hornet, a non-native species of hornet that specifically targets and feeds on honeybees. The sighting by a member of the public on a cauliflower in Bury, Lancashire which has since been traced back to Boston, Lincolnshire. DEFRA have said “Bee Inspectors from APHA National Bee Unit will be carrying out surveillance and monitoring in a 1-2 Km radius around the initial sighting. Additional monitoring and surveillance will be carried out in the Boston area where the cauliflower was grown.” Beekeepers and members of the public are urged to keep a look out for this hornet that is smaller than the European hornet. Pictures can be found on the BBKA website with information on what to do if you suspect you have seen one. You can also download the Asian Hornet Watch app for reporting possible sightings, or visit the Asian Hornet Action Tea...
  47. First confirmed sighting of Asian Hornet says DEFRA

    An Asian Hornet has been found by a member of the public in Bury in Lancashire. The hornet was found in a cauliflower which has been traced to Boston in Lincolnshire.  Defra says Asian hornet poses a risk to honeybees and work is already underway to identify any nests, which includes setting up surveillance zones and traps in both identified locations and deploying bee inspectors to visit local beekeepers.  This is the first confirmed sighting since last year, when a nest was discovered in Woolacombe in North Devon. That Asian Hornet incursion was successfully contained by bee inspectors who promptly tracked down and destroyed the nest.  Nationwide network of inspectors Nicola Spence, Defra Deputy Director for Plant and Bee Health said:  “We recognise the damage they can cause to honey bee colonies. That’s why we are taking swift and robust action to locate and investigate any nests in the Bury and Boston areas following this confirmed sighting.&rdq...
  48. GDPR Privacy Policy

    The British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) is committed to protecting and respecting your privacy. This Policy (together with our websites terms of use and any other documents referred to on it) explains when and why we collect personal information about people who visit our website, how we use it, the conditions under which we may disclose it to others and how we keep it secure. We may change this Policy from time to time so please check this page occasionally to ensure that you’re happy with any changes. By using our website, you’re agreeing to be bound by this Policy. Any questions regarding this Policy and our privacy practices should be sent by email to dpo@bbka.org.uk or by writing to the BBKA, The National Beekeeping Centre, National Agricultural Centre, Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire, CV8 2LG. The rules on processing of personal data are set out in the General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”).   Who are we? We’re...
  49. Terms of use BBKA website

    TERMS OF WEBSITE USE PLEASE READ THESE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS SITE Terms of website use This terms of use (together with the documents referred to in it) tells you the terms of use on which you may make use of our website BBKA.org.uk (our site), whether as a guest or a registered user. Use of our site includes accessing, browsing, or registering to use our site. Please read these terms of use carefully before you start to use our site, as these will apply to your use of our site. We recommend that you print a copy of this for future reference. By using our site, you confirm that you accept these terms of use and that you agree to comply with them. If you do not agree to these terms of use, you must not use our site. Other applicable terms These terms of use refer to the following additional terms, which also apply to your use of our site: Our Privacy Policy, which sets out the terms on which we process any personal data we collect from you, or t...
  50. Asian Hornet Action Teams

    Asian Hornet Action Team (AHAT) The BBKA is fully supporting Devon Beekeepers who have formed an Asian Hornet Action Team and given details of how other BKA's can do the same.  Here is a link to the Asian Hornet Action Team website: http://www.ahat.org.uk The National Bee Unit (NBU) has offered training in the tracking methods the inspectors use which will take place at the BBKA HQ at Stoneleigh or by arrangement at different regional centres.  You can find the Devon Asian Hornet Guidance Protocols here - http://www.devonbeekeepers.org.uk/asianhornet/guidance-for-beekeepers/ http://www.devonbeekeepers.org.uk/asianhornet/guidance-for-branches/ http://www.devonbeekeepers.org.uk/asianhornet/how-to-obtain-a-sample/ Keep checking this page for further updates on training etc  Why you might like to register your AHAT as a Local Action Group? On the Non Native Species Secretariat (NNSS) website, there is information about their Local Action Groups ...